Podcasting: Hear it, do it! RSVP now

Sign up for Podcasting 3.0 in Philadelphia

There are still some seats remaining for our Podcasting 3.0 workshop on Oct. 27 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Pen & Pencil Club, in Philadelphia.

This workshop will teach the basic techniques of recording, writing and editing your own podcast.

Register here.

New from Studio SPJ

Our latest episodes of Studio SPJ feature two interesting conversations with SPJ leaders.

In the first episode, Rebecca Baker, talks about her recently completed one-year term as president of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Hear Rebecca here.

In the second episode, Alex Tarquinio – our new SPJ president – talks about her hopes and plans for the year again.

Hear Alex here.

Both conversations were recording during the SPJ Excellence in Journalism conference in September in Baltimore.

Thanks Ron!

The New Jersey SPJ board recently honored Ron Miskoff for his service to the chapter and to journalism.

During a ceremony at our Sept. 18 meeting at Kean University, we presented Ron with a resolution expressing our gratitude for his service as chapter president, treasurer and board member. We also noted his role as co-founder and former president of the Foundation for Open Government.

The board presented Ron with a gift certificate to one of his favorite vegan restaurants in New Brunswick.…

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Doherty reports back from EIJ 2018

 

The first Fran Burns Scholarship given by the NJ Society of Professional Journalists went to Sarah Doherty, so that she could attend the national conference of the Society of Professional Journalists.

 

 

In Doherty’s words

Last year, I transferred into Rutgers University to find more opportunities that could help me achieve my life-long dream of becoming a news anchor. I found exactly what I was looking for when I had the opportunity to go to the 2018 Excellence in Journalism Conference in Baltimore, Maryland, thanks to the Fran Burns Scholarship.

Five sessions

I attended five sessions at the conference. My favorite session was the last session that I attended. The session was called “Unleash Your Inner Broadcaster” and the speakers were George Bodarky, Tracy Davidson, and Amy Tardif. Since I aspire to be a news anchor, this session was a perfect fit for me. At one point during the session, I was called to the front of the room and I read a news script. The speakers of the session then critiqued me on my reading and showed me how I could improve. Since I was bit nervous, they had me read the script as loudly as I could and then afterward I read it with absolutely no trouble. I found that incredible, and after watching many others go through their critiques, it seemed like a magic trick to me. The speakers always knew what exercises to give someone so that they could read the script back perfectly. I will definitely remember those tricks and save them for my future.

Favorite part: Davidson

My favorite part of the conference was seeing a familiar face, fellow news anchor Tracy Davidson. I met Davidson back in 2016 after winning the Widener University Student Leadership Award. I have always looked up to Davidson, especially after meeting her in person in 2016. When I first saw her at the conference I was shocked, and I went to talk to her immediately. She was so excited to see me that she took a video of me and posted it on her Instagram page. She also even gave me advice about internship opportunities and I could not be more grateful.

Attending the Excellence in Journalism Conference has been the highlight of my semester. I took pages and pages of notes while I was there, and I will definitely keep those notes in mind as I navigate through my college career. This conference has given me great advice and has taught me the steps I can take to be the best journalist that I can be.…

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Podcasting 3.0 is Oct. 27

Learn from experienced professionals

how to join the podcasting trend

PHILADELPHIA – Attention all you aspiring podcasters in the greater Philadelphia area.

The New Jersey and Keystone chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists will be hosting a one-day workshop called “Podcasting 3.0” on Saturday, Oct. 27, at the Pen & Pencil Club, 1522 Latimer St. in Philadelphia.

The workshop – which runs from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. – will show you some of the many possibilities of podcasting and teach you the basics of how to do a podcast.

Among the topics to be covered:

  • Tips on how to record the best quality audio for your podcast.
  • A survey of some of the best equipment for your recording.
  • A discussion of what makes a quality podcast, in terms of content.
  • How to best promote and distribute your podcast.
  • A review of best practices and resources for podcasters.

During the workshop, participants will have an opportunity on their lunch break to collect audio in Center City Philadelphia and return to the workshop to learn how to edit that audio, and how to write and deliver a script.

The cost of the workshop is $75 for professionals and $35 for students. The fee includes a one-year membership in the Society of Professional Journalists. Seating is limited. The fee does not include lunch. Attendees must bring their own smart phone and laptop.

Register here for the workshop.

Founded in 1909, the Society of Professional Journalists is the largest and oldest journalism organization in the U.S., with about 6,500 members. The society advocates for open records access, ethical journalism, newsroom diversity and journalism education.

The workshop will be taught by:

  Kayla Dwyer

A multimedia reporter for the Allentown Morning Call. She also is the producer of “Valley View,” the newspaper’s podcast.

   John Ensslin

A multimedia reporter for The Record and producer of the podcasts “On the Record” and “Studio SPJ.” John is a former national president of SPJ and the current president of New Jersey SPJ. A journalist for more than 30 years, he has been podcasting for the last eight years.

  Steve Lubetkin

A professional podcaster and managing partner of Lubetkin Media Companies in Cherry Hill, N.J. Steve is co-author of “The Business of Podcasting: How to Take Your Podcasting Passion from the Personal to the Professional.” Copies of the book will be available at the discounted price of $20.

 …

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About police dash cam videos

NJSPJ wants Attorney General

to improve police dash cam policy

The New Jersey chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists urges New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal to adopt a state-wide policy that all police dash cam videos be classified as public records as he has already done with dash cam videos from fatal police shootings.

The request comes in response to last week’s New Jersey Supreme Court 4-3 ruling that the police dash cam video in the case should not be considered a public record and therefore not be subject to disclosures required by the state’s Open Public Records Act.

The case stems from a lawsuit filed by public records advocate John Paff after a 2014 incident in which a Tuckerton police officer set a K-9 police dog on a woman pulled from her car after she committed several motor vehicle infractions. The incident was captured by police dash cam video.

This decision will have far-reaching consequences because it will curtail the public’s right to know about critical incidents and thus erode public confidence in law enforcement.

That is why we support calls for the attorney general to undo the damage done by the state’s high court’s decision by adopting a policy that outlines how all police dash cam videos are made and maintained.

Here’s why we believe last week’s decision is misguided:

  • It is inconsistent with the court’s ruling last year involving a police shooting case in Lyndhurst. The court found that the video was a public record given a policy established by the attorney general that requires police dash cam video be made public in all cases involving police shootings.
  • The majority decision argues the two are different because the Tuckerton video was made as a result of a municipal police chief’s order, not the attorney general’s, and therefore does not carry the “force of law’’ required to make it a public record.
  • However, we disagree and concur with Supreme Court Justice Barry T. Albin who, in his dissenting opinion found the distinction arbitrary. As Albin wrote: “The concerns expressed by the Court in favor of disclosure of a dash-cam video in a police shooting case apply with equal force here where a police dog was allowed to attack a driver stopped for motor vehicle infractions and eluding.’’

To further quote Judge Albin:

“In the wake of today’s majority opinion, the operations of our government will be less transparent and our citizenry less informed, which may lead to greater misunderstanding and more distrust between the public and the police. The majority drastically limits the public’s right to access video recordings made by police officers when they interact or have confrontations with members of the public. This closing of what ordinarily should be an open door of access to records violates both specific statutory provisions and the broad principles of OPRA, and is inconsistent with our own jurisprudence.”

New Jersey SPJ, along with several other organizations, filed a friend of the court brief in support of John Paff, the plaintiff in the case that the court ruled upon.…

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Hall of Fame; podcasting; 2019 contest

Hello fellow SPJ members,

A New Jersey Journalism Hall of Fame, podcast workshops and a bigger, better contest were among the topics discussed when the board of the New Jersey Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists held its annual summer retreat recently.

We met on July 28 in the Princeton Room of the Princeton Public Library surrounded by first-edition John McPhee books. The four-hour gathering was an opportunity for our board to make some plans for the year ahead. Here are a few things we discussed:

Holding our first-ever Journalism Hall of Fame event.

We did some initial planning last year by having former chapter presidents suggest and select nominees. This year we discussed actually staging the event, quite possibly at William Paterson University in Wayne. Stay tuned.

Expanding our signature awards contest beyond the current four categories.

This year we awarded our traditional honors of the Wilson Barto “Rookie of the Year,” the Tim O’Brien award for best use of open public records and the Stuart and Beverly Awbrey Award for community journalism. We also continued with our Courage Under Fire award, although no winners were chosen this year.

Next year we hope to add awards for journalism educator of the year, best audio story, best video story and journalist of the year. Do you have any ideas about categories that we should add? If so, let me know.

Hosting two “Podcasting 3.0” workshops

We’d hold one in Philadelphia and one in New York City later this year and early next year. This would be an updated “hands-on” workshop similar to one we did three years ago at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark. Both workshops would be done in collaboration with other SPJ chapters, one with the Keystone SPJ chapter in October and the other with the New York City Deadline Club in the spring.

Collaborating more with other chapters.

Watch for details on all of these events in the months ahead. And if you would like to be a part of the planning process, let me know by emailing me at johnensslin@gmail.com

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